Statues

Saint Teresa of Calcutta Statue

Saint Teresa of Calcutta Statue
$34.99

Saint Mother Teresa spent much of her life in the slums caring day to day and with profound respect for those who were abandoned or severely sick. Her relationship with God was complex and profound.  As she often was stating in letters and diaries she lived through spiritual darkness often times. Even with these doubts though, she continued her hard work, showing that real faith follows from seeing the world with compassion just as Christ taught us.

 

 

 

This unique statue is a part of the "In the Company of Saints" collection and is a resin replica of an original bronze mold. It measure 4.625" in height. 

ISBN/SKU: 
S-167

Saint Elizabeth Of Hungary, Patron Saint Of Teachers, 4.25" Bronze Statue

Saint Elizabeth Of Hungary, Patron Saint Of Teachers, 4.25" Bronze Statue
$29.99

Elizabeth (1207-31) was a queen of Hungary. Throughout her time at court she, however, lived a separate life. For a time she smuggled so many provisions out of the castle to the poor in the village below that she was severely rebuked. Her association with roses (one tops the enclosed small plaque) comes from a story about a member of the court catching her, cloak full of food meant for the poor, and demanding she show him what she had beneath the cloak. When she opened it, roses fell forth. Against the wishes of those in her class, she built a hospital in the basement of the castle and regularly fed and tended to the poor and suffering herself, providing the poor food, money, and work. In 1227 her husband died and Elizabeth moved to Marburg, where she received the habit and chord of the Franciscans and, with what remained of her inheritance, established a hospital for the sick, aged, and poor. At this time, care of the sick usually performed in hospitals only by men, but Elizabeth went against this, like many other, norms, and labored as a nurse. Her work was so strenuous that her health broke and she died several years after establishing her second hospital. All this work for the sick and suffering resulted in her being one of the patrons of nurses. One of the most extraordinary things about her was not simply her generosity and work to heal and comfort the sick but also the fact that she chose to do this work when other areas of life (for instance at court) were open to her. In other words, she gave up much in order to give to others. The original of this small image of Elizabeth giving nourishment to a poor child was handcarved by Hank Schlau and handpainted by Karen Schlau.

 

Dimensions: 4.25 (h) x 2.5 (w) .75 (d) inche

ISBN/SKU: 
S-031

Saint Jude 6" Bronze Statue

Saint Jude 6" Bronze Statue
$29.99

Of the original twelve apostles, St. Jude is the one most commonly invoked in prayer. Jude is cited only once in the Gospels and is probably the author of the Letter of Jude, the shortest book in the New Testament. Robert Ellsberg has written that Jude may have become the patron of those in difficult times because of “the similarity of his name to that of Judas Iscariot. For a long time this evidently inhibited supplicants from invoking the name of St. Jude. It might be supposed that this had the effect of storing up a good deal of efficacious power.” Jude has evoked considerable attention and even amusement over the years because of his association with “lost causes,” but there is, as millions know, a far more serious side to his patronage: Jude’s association with healing and bringing comfort to those in any type of difficult situation is one of the reasons so many hospitals and clinics have been named after him and why shrines to him are filled with symbols of his healing power of the body, mind, and spirit. In early Christian sculpture, Jude was often, as here, depicted with a boat because he was one of the first Christian missionaries and would have traveled extensively by ship. This piece was handmade by Hank Schlau and handpainted by Karen Schlau.

 

Dimensions: 6 x 1.5 x 1 inches

ISBN/SKU: 
S-061

Saint Catherine Of Alexandria 4.25" Bronze Statue

Saint Catherine Of Alexandria 4.25" Bronze Statue
$29.99

The story of Catherine of Alexandria (ca 4th century) has a long and rich history. The essentials are that at 18 she had a vision so powerful that she converted to Christianity. During the persecution of Maximus, Catherine, still a young woman, offered to debate the leading pagan philosophers. The story holds that Catherine’s ability to teach and explain was so compelling that she converted many of the opposing philosophers. Enraged, Maximus tried to have Catherine broken on the wheel; it was, however, the wheel, not Catherine, that broke, though she was later martyred by other means. Catherine became one of the most popular saints in the Middle Ages. (Later, Joan of Arc claimed that one of the voices of inspiration she heard was that of Catherine.) Catherine’s skill in explaining new ideas to a diverse audience is what made her one of the patrons of teachers and all those (like librarians) associated with learning and wisdom. This small depiction of Catherine, which was hand carved by Hank Schlau and painted by Karen Schlau, incorporates two key symbols associated with Catherine. As in William Morris’s famous stained glass window of Catherine, she is here depicted with a book in hand. The wheel above her head echoes that in Caravaggio’s painting of her. Catherine is now widely considered to be legendary, but that matters little: what matters is her example and inspiration to those who teach and those who emphasize the importance of wisdom.

 

Dimensions: 4.25 x 2.5 x .75 inches

ISBN/SKU: 
S-026